in Bios

Born and raised in the Bronx

Started teaching in 1971

Started at L.B.H.S. - 1972 (Auto Shop)

Retired from L.B.H.S. - 2004

Move to L.B. in 1975

Education:

A.A.S. at Bronx Community College 1969

B.S. at C.C.N.Y - 1972

M.S. at C.C.N.Y. - 1975

P.D. at CW Post - 1984

Certificaitons:

Driving & Traffic Safety (DMV NY) - 1975

A.T.T.P. - State of NY - 1988-1992

ASE - 1989

P.S.I.A. (Ski Instructor) -1980

Personal History

Musician - 1962-1982

Custom Auto Shop - 1968-1972 (S&S)

Supervisor/Driver's Education Program - 1979-1990

TV Host - You Auto Know - 1993-1997)

Radio Co-Host 2001-2004, then call in Contributor unti December, 2018

Hobbies - Present

Still wrenching at home

Creating stained glass projects

Woodworking

Traveling

Motorcycling (1999 FLHTCUI

 

 

 

 

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Lil Ray
in Bios

The Gears That Turn the Wheel that is Ray Guarino

Although having earned an A.A.S. degree in Electronic Instrumentation Technology and a B.S. degree in Organizational Management, Ray's life work has found him striving to become the best "automologist" he could possibly be.

Ray has held jobs as an auto parts counterman, machinist, plastic injection molder/mold-maker, and an auto electric rebuilder. His life-long love of all things mechanical, coupled with his job experience, has given him a "No Fear" attitude when it comes to taking things apart and (hopefully), fixing, modifying, and ultimately improving them design-wise and functionally.

As an electronic technician and later as a corporate metallurgist, Ray worked in the R&D area of the Engineering Department at Leviton Manufacturing. Currently a member of the Professional Faculty at a NY college, Ray finds great joy interacting with students who show a love for mechanics and cars like he does. 

Being an avid Hot Rodder, motorcyclist, competition dart player, marksman and car show judge has equipped Ray with the tools needed to survive in the automotive world but his greatest fulfillment is realized when he spends time with his wife, daughters and pets.

Since he was seven years old Ray was playing around with discarded cars in the driveway, which inevitably led to building go-carts, mini bikes and eventually his own cars from junk parts. Ray has always prided himself on being able to take a discarded part and make it useful, or create something needed using the spare parts he has acquired. Short lengths of tubing, end scraps of metal, oddball components, and even ceiling fans have been integrated into Ray's motorcycle and automotive projects as alternatives to store bought products.

The future is an open book for this car guy, but Ray hopes to pursue an involvement in the automotive media with his co-host and friend Chris Switzer, someday making a dollar as a result of their work as partners on MotorMouth Radio.

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in Bios

What Does Joe Know - Red.png

Joe didn't start out as a car guy; much of his teenage years were spent as a bass player, gigging local venues.  When the typical teenage need for a car finally reared its head, Joe's dad made him an offer he couldn't refuse:  The family's old Tempest sat in the driveway unusable.  Joe's dad said, "If you can get it running, you can have it".  That required Joe to absorb more automotive knowledge and that is what he did.

Joe then landed a job at the local auto parts store doing grunt work; shelf stocking, sweeping, deliveries, and more.  Between studying the books during slow times and asking questions at the shops, he made deliveries, and worked his way up to counterman.  He continued learning at the feet of older hot rodders, racers and shop mechanics to hone his own wrenching skills because a good parts guy understands the mechanic's lot and vice versa.  Switching jobs to a fledgling high performance/speed shop, Joe delved more into the hardcore mods, such as engine assembly, in addition to the usual manifold, carb, and header stuff.

The big change came for Joe when he stepped up to work at the local Chevy dealer.  Armed with experience in high performance and working on many muscle car era GM's, Joe became "that guy" people go to for GM high performance and resto parts in the area.  While other dealers blew "those performance guys" off, Joe would come up with the part number.  While there, giving parts out to shop mechanics, they noticed he had a knack for helping out with troubleshooting the newer computerized vehicles.  He was happier "hands on" than peddling parts.

Working as a junior guy at a local repair shop, the boss quickly found that Joe was not cut out for bull work.  The boss did find that Joe could read schematics and flow charts plus he fit under places like dashboards making his niche for drivability and electrical analysis obvious.  To develop those skills Joe attended aftermarket training classes, the NYS ATTP (where he eventually became an instructor) to reading anything he could get his hands on from various car manufacturers.

Once he certified as ASE A1, A5, A6, A7, A8 and L1 Joe found himself working at the Standard Motor Products Tech Help line as their GM specialist.  The next 12 years consisted of "fixing cars blindfolded".  Joe likes to say “I am a one-eyed man in the land of the blind”.

Today MotorMouth Radio's most recent addition is a full time "Car Guy".  His "day job" is with a major auto parts manufacturer answering tech questions from professional mechanics and do-it--yourselfers alike.  After putting in his hours at a desk, he jumps into his rolling toolbox and visits shops to lend his diagnostics slant on problem cars they've run across during the day.

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Latest MMR Show

Sunday, August 11, 2019

Ray is out for today and MMR founder & friend Chris Switzer steps in to show us all how it's supposed to be done. Chris & Joe talk about buying auto parts locally vs by mail order, what "the parts guy stare" is all about, and Chris catches us up on his recent Chrysler convertible project cars.
 

Music Played on Show:

Song Intros - Assorted Link Wray songs:

1) 

Listen to MMR Live on Sundays, 12 to 1pm

ListenMotorMouthRadioLiveon90.3 WHPC FM


 
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